General Psychology

Purpose

This course is a general introduction to the basic concepts, methods, and findings of contemporary psychology. It is an introduction to the science of behavior and mental processes. Students will be exposed to the various areas within the field such as learning theory, development, personality, clinical psychology, and intelligence.

Psychology of Religion and Spirituality

Purpose

Psychology of Religion and Spirituality was created to make sense of the conflicts clearly occurring among religious groups today. These conflicts have been happening for centuries but appear to have become more personalized due to the instantaneous delivery and presentation of information via social media. Distinguishing the terms of religion and spirituality relies on form where religion seems to be tangible, and spirituality intangible. Both involve a search, but religion provides structure to the search for significance within the confines of institutions, (Sisemore, 2016). Spirituality involves the search and/or witnessing of the inviolable - those entities that are to be unequivocally venerated, honored and respected due to the true good (and love) that exists. As we search and learn, we fail (or some would say sin), and failures are our best teachers. The question is what do we do with our failures (behavior), and how do we think about our failures (mental processes)? Many times there are discrepancies between our thoughts and actions, like for example claiming to be religious but the individual's actions betray those beliefs. Yet, there are those who have documented their or others' quests and have said to arrive at a sense of peace and/or enlightenment, like Gloria Anzaldua, Lillian Comas-Diaz, Thich Nhat Han, William James and Carl Jung.

 Statistics for the Behavioral Sciences flower

Purpose

Statistics in the Behavioral Sciences introduce students to understanding statistical analyses utilized as professional tools in the social and behavioral sciences. These analyses include descriptive statistics (summaries and organization) and inferential statistics (drawing inferences from samples to make generalizations or conclusions about populations). In my class there is a major emphasis on vocabulary and descriptive statistics and minor emphasis on inferential statistics.

General Psychology

Purpose

This foundational course covers human development from a selected number of psychological theoretical perspectives. By development, we refer to “patterns of growth and change that occur in human beings between conception and death,” (Woolfolk & Perry, 2012, p. 4). For the purposes of this course, we follow human physical, social, emotional and cognitive growth from infancy to adulthood. Using the biopsychosocial approach, we study the maturation of human beings to better understand how both nature and nurture affect behavioral, cultural and cognitive trajectories. Finally in studying both continuity and change that occurs as we develop, major issues, controversies and cross-cultural perspectives are discussed.

Humanistic Psychology

Purpose

This humanistic psychology course was created to introduce the ideologies, epistemologies and practices of humanistic and existential psychologists to my students and my self. We aimed to become aware of the strengths and weaknesses of humanity that propel them to nurture their own psychological development. We recognized that psychology does not only reflect the philosophy and methodology of the natural science, but that too of spiritual science. Furthermore, we sought to become open to the states that human beings respond and are shaped by internal influences, and that construction of realities can be multi-dimensional and predominantly contextual. The life experience set forth by the human being is one of the highest dignity and fails to replicate to the experience of another due to the complexity, uniqueness and illogicality.

Experimental Psychology Picture

Purpose

This is an experimental psychology course offered in one semester to undergraduate students. This course is designed to be half-seminar and half-lecture. During the lecture portion, students review qualitative and quantitative research design methodologies, ethics, and threats to internal and external validity. Specifically we complete exercises that address and contend with the four canons of science (determinism, empiricism, parsimony and testability). Furthermore we endeavor to discover avenues in knowing about the world through four angles mentioned in the textbook written by Pelham & Blanton. These four angles respectively are intuition, consulting an authority figure, logic and empirical observation. In discovery, students attempt to complete a research project during the half-seminar portion of the class.